Great Pagoda restoration, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew

Restoration of the Great Pagoda

Update 13/07/2018

In recognition of our sponsorship of one of the newly restored dragons, we were invited by Historic Royal Palaces  to the opening of the Great Pagoda yesterday in the presence of His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales.

The Pagoda is now open to access so you can climb to the top and take in the panoramic views across the Gardens and beyond. The dragons are most easily seen from the outside though you can see their snouts and the occasional claw if you look hard from inside.

The dragons restored

The ground floor entrance has been transformed with information on the history of the Pagoda, a panel showing who contributed to the restoration, including the Kew Society, and two large encased automata – turn the handles and different objects and figures in the scene start to move. Below is a picture of the Director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Richard Deverell admiring one of the installations which depicts William Chambers, the architect of the Pagoda, visiting Canton.

Richard Deverell admiring the automata

At each level the floor you have reached is shown in beautiful lettering. Here is the number 5 – the level occupied by our dragon.

The floral lettering for the number of each level

 

 

 

At the top floor are equally beautifully executed descriptions of the vistas, including our dragon’s view of the Royal Observatory.

Update 04/07/2018

The Great Pagoda within the Royal Botanic Gardens has been beautifully restored to its former glory. The meticulous work has been overseen by the Historic Royal Palaces. The Kew Society sponsored 1 of the flight of 80 dragons which were one of the original  features of the Pagoda. Our dragon is on level 5, position 6, and, appropriately we think given our concerns for the heritage of Kew, faces the historic King’s Observatory.
You can see our dragon here:
You can see more background to the history of the Great Pagoda here: https://www.kew.org/kew-gardens/attractions/great-pagoda
And on the King’s Observatory here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/King%27s_Observatory

Sorry, comments are closed for this post.

NEWS

Great Pagoda restoration, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew
Restoration of the Great Pagoda Update 13/07/2018 In recognition of our sponsorship o [more]
Richmond in Bloom
Richmond in Bloom: Best Village in Bloom Update 08/07/2018 The judges - Hugo Ross Tatum and Ed [more]

EVENTS

Event Information:

  • Sun
    12
    Aug
    2018
    2pm or 3pmSandycoombe Rd. St Margaret's

    Turners House has been carefully restored and is now open to the public once more.

    Sandycombe Lodge was built by 1813 to the designs of England’s great landscape painter, J.M.W. Turner; working here as his own architect to create a quiet retreat for himself, away from the pressures of the London art world. It also provided a home for his father, old William, in retirement from his trade as a barber and wigmaker in Covent Garden. With old William’s declining health and changes in his own life, Turner sold the house in 1826.  After an interesting history which includes 'airmens goggles' it was bought by Professor Harold Livermore and his wife Ann in 1947. They were careful custodians of the house and its precious heritage, and well-informed collectors of art relating to Turner and his time. In the 1950s they secured Grade 2* listing for the building. Professor Livermore set up The Sandycombe Lodge Trust, now Turner’s House Trust, in 2005 and on his death at the age of 95 in 2010, the Trust became the owner of Sandycombe.

    Please join us for a guided tour either at 2pm or 3pm.

    Please note that within the house, only the ground floor drawing room is fully accessible for visitors with mobility issues. The garden, and toilet is fully wheelchair accessible.

    Ticket price £6 per person.

    To buy tickets with a cheque (no fees) click here to download the form

    To buy tickets via credit or debit card (with fees via eventbrite) click here