About The Kew Society

About The Kew Society

The Kew Society, which is more than 100 years old, is an influential organisation dedicated to enhancing the beauty and character of Kew with its historic legacy of buildings and green spaces.

In 1987 the Kew Society became a registered charity.

Main Aims of The Kew Society

Main Aims of The Kew Society

To review all planning applications in Kew with special regard to the architectural integrity and character of the neighbourhood.

To play an active role in the improvement of local amenities.

Keeping residents in touch with what is happening in their community.

To achieve its aims The Kew Society

To achieve its aims The Kew Society

Works closely with Local Government Councillors and the local Member of Parliament

Monitors all the planning applications and comments as needed

Makes representations to public and private organisations

Works with other organisations involved with local environmental issues including our green spaces, the towpath, pollution and aircraft noise.

Committee and Volunteers

Committee and Volunteers

The Kew Society is run by unpaid volunteers.  The Executive Committee meets eleven times a year while sub-committees look after particular areas of interest.

The Society organises community events including parties, picnics, lectures and outings and produces the Kew Society Newsletter with information about general local issues, events, planning matters and forthcoming activities.

Come and join us – get in touch

NEWS

Great Pagoda restoration, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew
Restoration of the Great Pagoda Update 30/07/2018 Polly Putnam, one of the Historic R [more]
Richmond in Bloom
Richmond in Bloom: Best Village in Bloom Update 08/07/2018 The judges - Hugo Ross Tatum and Ed [more]

EVENTS

Event Information:

  • Fri
    11
    May
    2018
    6:30 pmKew Gardens at Elizabeth Gate, Kew Green.

    Kew Palace, also known as the Dutch House, was built in 1631 for a Flemish merchant, Samuel Fortrey and his wife, Catherine de Latfeur.  Their initials remain carved over the entrance to Kew Palace.

    The house was leased by Queen Caroline and later bought by George III who spent happy summers at Kew Palace with his wife, Queen Charlotte and their 15 children.   It was an important refuge during his infamous episodes of 'madness'. After Queen Charlotte died in 1818, Kew Palace was closed up.  It was acquired by RBG Kew 80 years later and opened to the public for the first time.

    The Royal Kitchens, next to the Palace, are preserved from the time of Queen Charlotte's death in 1818. The Great Kitchen and preparation rooms give an insight into Georgian culinary life and the servants who worked there.

    We will finish our tour by raising a glass to royal toasts, hosts and maybe ghosts!

    Please note that there is a lift in the palace but not in the kitchens where there are a lot of steps.

    Tickets for members only: £8 to include a glass of wine

    To book tickets using a creditcard click here (with fees via eventbrite)

    To pay by cheque (no fees) please click here to down load the form