About The Kew Society

About The Kew Society

The Kew Society, which is more than 100 years old, is an influential organisation dedicated to enhancing the beauty and character of Kew with its historic legacy of buildings and green spaces.

In 1987 the Kew Society became a registered charity.

Main Aims of The Kew Society

Main Aims of The Kew Society

To review all planning applications in Kew with special regard to the architectural integrity and character of the neighbourhood.

To play an active role in the improvement of local amenities.

Keeping residents in touch with what is happening in their community.

To achieve its aims The Kew Society

To achieve its aims The Kew Society

Works closely with Local Government Councillors and the local Member of Parliament

Monitors all the planning applications and comments as needed

Makes representations to public and private organisations

Works with other organisations involved with local environmental issues including our green spaces, the towpath, pollution and aircraft noise.

Committee and Volunteers

Committee and Volunteers

The Kew Society is run by unpaid volunteers.  The Executive Committee meets eleven times a year while sub-committees look after particular areas of interest.

The Society organises community events including parties, picnics, lectures and outings and produces the Kew Society Newsletter with information about general local issues, events, planning matters and forthcoming activities.

Come and join us – get in touch


Electric Vehicle Charging Points Update 19/02/2018 Richmond Council are consulting on the loca [more]
London Mayor's draft new London Plan Update 28/02/2018 We have submitted comments from the Kew [more]


Event Information:

  • Wed
    6.45pm for 7pm startThe National Archives

    A316, early days.

    Paul Velluet, President of the Richmond Local History Society, Chartered Architect and former Assistant Regional Director of English heritage, has kindly agreed to give a talk to The Kew Society entitled “Richmond Divided”, on the building of the A316 that promises to be both fascinating and enlightening.

    The presentation will include archived maps, going back to the 1700’s and photographs from the 1930’s cataloguing each stage of the roads development and the necessary demolition of existing housing stock.

    As we drive, cycle and attempt to navigate the A316 on foot, we might now be much more likely to take notice of the evidence of the distant past along its route. 

    Tickets available on the door.

    Kew Society members £3, Non-members £6