About The Kew Society

About The Kew Society

The Kew Society, which is more than 100 years old, is an influential organisation dedicated to enhancing the beauty and character of Kew with its historic legacy of buildings and green spaces.

In 1987 the Kew Society became a registered charity.

Main Aims of The Kew Society

Main Aims of The Kew Society

To review all planning applications in Kew with special regard to the architectural integrity and character of the neighbourhood.

To play an active role in the improvement of local amenities.

Keeping residents in touch with what is happening in their community.

To achieve its aims The Kew Society

To achieve its aims The Kew Society

Works closely with Local Government Councillors and the local Member of Parliament

Monitors all the planning applications and comments as needed

Makes representations to public and private organisations

Works with other organisations involved with local environmental issues including our green spaces, the towpath, pollution and aircraft noise.

Committee and Volunteers

Committee and Volunteers

The Kew Society is run by unpaid volunteers.  The Executive Committee meets eleven times a year while sub-committees look after particular areas of interest.

The Society organises community events including parties, picnics, lectures and outings and produces the Kew Society Newsletter with information about general local issues, events, planning matters and forthcoming activities.

Come and join us – get in touch

NEWS

Great Pagoda restoration, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew
Restoration of the Great Pagoda Update 13/07/2018 In recognition of our sponsorship o [more]
Richmond in Bloom
Richmond in Bloom: Best Village in Bloom Update 08/07/2018 The judges - Hugo Ross Tatum and Ed [more]

EVENTS

Event Information:

  • Wed
    17
    Jan
    2018
    5:30 pmRoyal Botanic Gardens, Kew

    Kew Society members were offered a rare opportunity to visit the Economic Botany Collection at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. This is the oldest and perhaps the most fascinating of Kew's science collections containing over 100,000 items. The collection began in 1847.

    The tour was lead by Mark Nesbitt, who is senior Ethobotanist and Curator at RGB Kew and he delved into Kew's history and current science research via a unique collections of rubber, lacebark, Chinese medicines and other useful plants. The term Economic Botany essentially means 'useful plants'.

     

    Jamaica lace plant. George II once had a suit made using this 'imitation' lace.

    The bark simply peals back to expose this extraordinary lace.

    Mark has been working with groups to help reintroduce this plant for commercial purposes.

    The collection houses many & varied Chinese medicines.

    These Alpine plants from New Zealand were labelled 'Vegetable Sheep' and caused a sensation in Victorian London.

    Maori cloak, though to be ceremonial. Made from an Alpine plant that mimics leather.

    Mark has been working with ethnic groups using this very valuable cloak.

    Wild rubber hot water bottle.

     

    The tour was very generously free and we are exceedingly grateful to Mark Nesbitt for making this most generous offer to our members.

    Click here for Mark's own page detailing his research